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  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the image (center) who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate from the machinery of the State), but as a foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of deliberate separation of Church and State. The Founders had learned from historical precedent that amalgamation of  Church and State leads to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.<br />
<br />
As for the reporter to image left, and contrary to the male reporter, (and the female  reporter (center) in a different exchange), her questions appeared tight and proper, eliciting information with no overtone of sensationalism, or trying to get "red meat" for a story.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the image (center) who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate from the machinery of the State), but as a foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of deliberate separation of Church and State. They point out that the  Founders had learned from historical precedent, that amalgamation of  Church and State leads to destruction of Nations.<br />
<br />
Also in the image is another reporter (female, center) who, while this photographer was standing adjacent,  approached a group of citizens voicing their opinions, and asked if they were Jewish and what group they were with. After the citizens said they were with no group, and they were not Jewish, but Christians,

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/protesters-disrupt-rally-at-capitol-by-muslims-sup/njzNM/?ecmp=statesman_social_facebook_2014_sfp#5bc68b30.3581740.735627<br />
<br />
(Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a and  a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, it is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State that the Founders knew very well lead to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Christine Weick being interviewed in Texas during the Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabbed the microphone, saying to those assembled :  <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion ( or vice versa),  and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States, and indeed, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which is stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that allowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known.<br />
<br />
As they started the press conference, activist Christine Weick grabs the microphone, saying those assembled   <br />
<br />
“I proclaim the name of the lord Jesus Christ over the Capitol of Texas,” Christine Weick said. “I stand against Islam and the false prophet Muhammad. Islam will never dominate the United States. And by the grace of God it will not dominate Texas.”<br />
<br />
<br />
Weick travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system wrapped up in a religion and that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political stucture of the United States and indeed is in cpntradiction to the creation of the Uniteds States which is based on a separation of Church and State .<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.<br />
<br />
She states that alloowing such a service is nothing but a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam, which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Austin, Texas ~ Texas Muslim Day<br />
<br />
“I love the knuckleheads,” said CAIR-TX’s executive director, Mustafaa Carroll of Houston. “In fact, I want to thank them publicly for being here, because they help you guys (reporters) get here. So they’re helping us. We want our children to see what’s going on in this world. We want our community to see.”<br />
<br />
Not reported in any story of note is that his remark was in response to a leading question  by the male reporter in the images who first used the "knucklehead" pejorative - this photographer hearing the question and being astounded at such a striking display of media bias and journalistic non-integrity.<br />
<br />
The citizens to whom the speaker was so pejoratively referring are those, who in their own way, are trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States, of,  not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate from the machinery of the State), but as a foreign political system wrapped up in a cloak of religion ( or vice versa).<br />
<br />
They feel that such amalgamation is antithetical to the political structure of the United States and is a clear and present danger to the US Political Compact.  Indeed, they feel Islam, in its wrapping of political and religious in one entity, is in contradiction to one of the principles apparent in the history of the creation of the United States, which stands on the proposition and implementation of a system of deliberate separation of Church and State. The Founders had learned from historical precedent that amalgamation of  Church and State leads to destruction of Nations in which the Church and the State were one.<br />
<br />
As for the reporter to image left, and contrary to the male reporter,(and the female  reporter (center) in a different exchange), her questions appeared tight and proper, eliciting information with no overtone of sensationalism, or trying to get "red meat" for a story.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Muslims gather at the State Capitol in Austin Texas to lobby their Texas legislative delegations and make their presence known. Standing in the background ( gray tee-shirt, blond hair, speaker right), is Christine Weick, an activist who travels the country trying to sound the alarm about what many consider to be a creeping infiltration into the United States of not a religion as Westerners think of religion (as being separate form the machinery of the State), but as foreign political system that is antithetical to that of the United States.<br />
<br />
Weick made national headlines when she voiced her disgust and objection to a Muslim prayer service that was allowed to be held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. She states that such a service is a propaganda vehicle for the propagation of Islam which is considered not a religion existing under the political machine of the state, but a political religion where there is a conflation of the Church and the State, indeed the State being the Church, or in the alternate the State being subordinate to the Church.

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • Led by local and well known civil rights activist Gabriel Velasquez, citizens take to the streets in the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas. Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..

  • A contingent representing native american rights and awareness leads the way at the head of the annual Cesar Chavez March in San Antonio, Texas.<br />
<br />
Waving flags printed with the flying eagle logo of the United Farm Workers founded by Chavez to press for recognition of farm worker rights in California, marchers following this spearhead cry out "Si, se puede" as they voice their enthusiasm for the rights of workers to fair pay and fair treatment in employment and other areas. In addition to those supporting the original vision of Chavez, the group also comprised others that wanted to use the occasion to voice their support for other kinds of rights for various other groups as well as those urging support for various congressional political candidates in the upcoming November 2016 elections..





















  • Austin, Texas ~ The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit side by side on the reception desk of Texas State Representative Molly White of Belton Texas.<br />
<br />
Belton is near Killeen's Fort Hood, the scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, by Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.<br />
<br />
The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitization, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence".<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for finally being a politician to stand firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office."

  • Austin, Texas ~ The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit side by side on the reception desk of Texas State Representative Molly White of Belton Texas.<br />
<br />
Belton is near Killeen's Fort Hood, the scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, by Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.<br />
<br />
The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitization, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence".<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for finally being a politician to stand firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office."














































































  • Austin, Texas ~ The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit side by side on the reception desk of Texas State Representative Molly White of Belton Texas.<br />
<br />
Belton is near Killeen's Fort Hood, the scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, by Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, and Muslim who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others in what he later called retaliation for U.S. wars in the Muslim world. During his killing rampage,  Major Nidal Hasan shouted "Allahu Akbar" ("God is greatest" in Arabic), and later said he wanted to be a martyr.<br />
<br />
<br />
The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitation, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence".<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for being a politician to finally stand firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office."



  • The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit on the reception desk of Representative Molly White( Belton near Fort Hood, scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, when a mass murder took place  perpetuated by  Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others. The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitization, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence"<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for standing firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office.

  • Austin, Texas ~ The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit side by side on the reception desk of Texas State Representative Molly White of Belton Texas.<br />
<br />
Belton is near Killeen's Fort Hood, the scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, by Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.<br />
<br />
The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitization, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence".<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for finally being a politician to stand firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office."

  • Austin, Texas ~ The United States flag and the Israeli flag sit side by side on the reception desk of Texas State Representative Molly White of Belton Texas.<br />
<br />
Belton is near Killeen's Fort Hood, the scene of the acts of terror perpetuated on  November 5, 2009, by Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.<br />
<br />
The shooting produced more casualties than any other on an American military base. Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman, General Barry McCaffrey, and others have called the event a terrorist attack while some in the US Government, in lock step with an agenda of speech suppression and sanitization, eschew the term terror and refer to the acts of extreme savagery as "workplace violence".<br />
<br />
White drew praise from constituents for finally being a politician to stand firm on American values, asking Muslim visitors to her office on Texas Muslim Day to " ... renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws."<br />
<br />
"Today is Texas Muslim Capital Day in Austin. The House is in recess until Monday. Most Members including myself are back in District. I did leave an Israeli flag on the reception desk in my office with instructions to staff to ask representatives from the Muslim community to renounce Islamic terrorist groups and publicly announce allegiance to America and our laws. We will see how long they stay in my office."

















































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